Vermicompost (Worm Compost) is a process of composting organic food waste using red wigglers and other beneficial microorganisms. Vermicompost contains a combination of worm castings and other organic matter that is fully or partially worm worked. Worm Castings are the finished product of vermicompost that has been recycled through the worms. They continue to eat and excrete the same organic matter many times over a period of up to 1 year. Finished Castings look like black coffee grounds.
We have been asked which earthworm is native to our soil in our local community. My answer is always "NONE". This link gives a brief history of our earthworms and how they got here. http://www.allaboutwildlife.com/invasive-species/invasive-eartworms-in-american-soil/4545
The "Worm Condo" is considered a flow through vermiculture bin or "continuous flow system". It will help save the task of labor and time in separating worms from the finished material. Set aside all wine boxes except one for later use.  TO SET UP: fill one of the wine boxes half full of moist bedding. Start off with strips of paper soaked in water for about 15 minutes; you can also add brown leaves, cardboard, 2 handfuls of soil, compost, non aromatic sawdust, coconut coir, coffee grounds to this mix as desired. Place the worms and any bedding they are packed in, on top…
Setting Up: Begin with 6” of bedding and 1” layer of feedstock (don’t cover entire surface), cover with more bedding and moisten. Adding 1-2 handfuls of soil is OK but not mandatory. Add 1-2 lbs of wigglers to 1 square foot of surface area of bin. This means square foot of SURFACE area, not depth. Worms/New Bed/New Environment: Worms are definitely Not Hungry in the beginning. Leave a light on the first few days to keep them contained in their new bin, preventing escapees. WAIT until feedstock is eaten before adding more. Worms will continue to move upward as more…
My worm ‘hobby’ began in 1999 after attending a Master Gardner Composting class. My hobby continues to keep me fascinated by red wigglers and the work they do recycling my kitchen garbage. I have had successes and failure over the years; I have experimented, tested and watched my garden thrive. Two years ago I wanted to learn more so off I went to North Carolina State University’s annual Vermiculture Conference. The conference and people were so inspiring I went again in November 2012 to attend the 13th annual Vermicompost Conference in North Carolina. This is the only conference about earthworm…
You picked up your Red Wigglers, Now What?   Place the worms on top of the bedding or under a light, they will immediately migrate down to get away from the light. Nights 1 and 2, they will try to leave when it gets dark. I recommend keeping a light on, near their new home and allowing some light to filter inside. This encourages them from migrating out as they are very sensitive to light.   It is important that the top of the soil stays wet to damp as this is where the worms spend most of their time.…
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